Archive from March, 2012
31 Mar
2012
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Deal­ing with Neg­a­tive Peo­ple in Your Life

” When some­one treats you like you’re not good enough, ignore them. If you meet some­one who says your idea will never work or that your efforts are being wasted, run in the oppo­site direc­tion. Accept that these peo­ple will never under­stand your pas­sion or your dreams and move on from them and do not look back. Never let their neg­a­tiv­ity affect you or your pos­i­tive thought process. When I hear the words “no” I know that I am only speak­ing with the wrong per­son and you should remem­ber the same the next time a door closes. You have the desire to suc­ceed and deserve to be sur­rounded by oth­ers with the same drive; a com­mit­ment to your goals is some­thing to be proud of. You are the bet­ter per­son for liv­ing in pos­si­bil­ity, for liv­ing with the hope and knowl­edge that one day you will achieve some­thing great.”

via Deal­ing with Neg­a­tive Peo­ple in Your Life.

28 Mar
2012
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Cop­ing With Twitter’s Unfol­low Bug | TechCrunch

” If you’re like me, you may have noticed that Twit­ter may be arbi­trar­ily, ran­domly, and hap­haz­ardly, unfol­low­ing peo­ple you fully intended to fol­low. Sim­i­larly, if you’ve ever noticed your friends and con­tacts unfol­lowed you, it may have caused a sense of con­fu­sion, dread, or self-insecurity. Before one spi­rals into a series of apolo­gies or deep-depression, it’s likely not your fault, whew!.What’s caus­ing this? I’m not sure, so I asked my proper con­tacts at Twit­ter who responded “This is a bug, and our team is work­ing to fix it.” They also sent me a link to their sup­port FAQ, which indi­cates the known issue. I’ll leave it to the team at Twit­ter to get this resolved, but in the mean­time, let’s dis­cuss how we can cope with this indus­try phenomenon. …”

read more … source/via Cop­ing With Twitter’s Unfol­low Bug | TechCrunch.

 

Here we are.
Photo Credit: Brian M Forbes via Comp­fight

27 Mar
2012
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5 Really Use­ful Respon­sive Web Design Pat­terns | Design Shack

” Respon­sive web design requires a very dif­fer­ent way of think­ing about lay­out that is both chal­leng­ing and excit­ing. The art of lay­out was already com­plex enough for the cen­turies that it was defined by fixed ele­ments, now things are becom­ing expo­nen­tially more com­pli­cated as lay­outs become increas­ingly adaptive.

To help repro­gram your brain to con­sider lay­outs in new ways, we’re going to take a look at some inter­est­ing respon­sive design pat­terns that are being imple­mented by tal­ented design­ers all over the web. ..”

read more (source) via 5 Really Use­ful Respon­sive Web Design Pat­terns | Design Shack.

 
Elmastudio on a Smartphone
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27 Mar
2012
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Great Rea­sons for Why Busi­nesses Should Use Twit­ter » Pimp My Brand Name

” You might be sit­ting in front of your com­puter ask­ing your­self: how exactly can twit­ter help my business?

For starters Twit­ter is quick, easy, and above all else, it is instan­ta­neous. Twit­ter is the SMS of the World Wide Web. Yet, instead of send­ing a mes­sage to just a hand­ful of peo­ple it can reach thou­sands in a mat­ter of sec­onds. Reach out to your exist­ing cus­tomers by being a resource; or bring in new cus­tomers by pro­vid­ing rel­e­vant infor­ma­tion. The more adamant you are about keep­ing up with what your cus­tomers are say­ing, the more fol­low­ers you will have! One of the golden rules to Twit­ter is: Fol­low in order to be fol­lowed. How­ever, that doesn’t mean you should go out and fol­low just any­one for the sake of gain­ing fol­low­ers. You need to be selec­tive with who you fol­low and ulti­mately keep in mind that you want to be fol­lowed by your customers.

You can use Twit­ter to do the following:

  • Tweet to the masses
  • Send direct mes­sages to your customers
  • @mention spe­cific cus­tomers to get their attention
  • Link con­tent (i.e. your web­site, pic­tures, inter­est­ing arti­cles, etc.)
  • Adver­tis­ing new prod­ucts or ser­vices to help keep your cus­tomers up-to-date
  • Offer spe­cial dis­counts or coupons for Twit­ter followers
  • Gain cus­tomer feedback
  • Help retain customers
  • Keep an eye on your competitors

Twit­ter is lim­it­less! (Aside from the 140 char­ac­ter limit of course)

The only thing hold­ing you back from reach­ing out to a wider cus­tomer base is you. So do your­self a favor and jump on the Twit­ter train to success!”

source/via Great Rea­sons for Why Busi­nesses Should Use Twit­ter » Pimp My Brand Name.

Twitter bird logo icon illustration
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Matt Hamm via Comp­fight

27 Mar
2012
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Social Media Mar­ket­ing Strat­egy Mini Course, Prt 1 of 5: Be Mind­ful Of Your Mar­ket­ing Objec­tives « Social Media Hive: Social Media Mar­ket­ing Tuition – Online, Live & Interactive.

” “Why are you using social media to mar­ket your busi­ness? Don’t you have some­thing bet­ter to do with all those hours you’re spend­ing on it?”Sometimes, when I see what some busi­nesses are doing with their social media mar­ket­ing, that’s what crosses my mind. Gen­er­ally, I can tell by look­ing at a Face­book busi­ness page or a Twit­ter account, if the busi­ness owner has a strat­egy or not. The big give away is when the social media doesn’t reflect what the busi­ness does, sells or is about.

via Social Media Mar­ket­ing Strat­egy Mini Course, Prt 1 of 5: Be Mind­ful Of Your Mar­ket­ing Objec­tives « Social Media Hive: Social Media Mar­ket­ing Tuition – Online, Live & Interactive..

 

09-jun-10
Photo Credit: Paul Joseph via Comp­fight

Sim­ple, it keeps you focussed, it stops you from wast­ing time and ulti­mately will save you money, there­fore boost­ing your profits.

It’s a ref­er­ence of  what you want to achieve (objec­tives), what you are going to do to get there (strat­egy) and what it will look like when you are there (mon­i­tor­ing /KPI’s).

Be Mind­ful Of Your Mar­ket­ing Ojectives

Get clear about what you want to achieve with your social media marketing.

  • Do you want to drive traf­fic to: your web­site / sales page / blog.
  • Are you pro­mot­ing a: prod­uct / ser­vice / event.
  • Are you try­ing to: sell some­thing /get a job / man­age your reputation
  • Are you high­light­ing a: cause / gath­er­ing inter­est / drum­ming up support
  • Are you estab­lish­ing: your­self as an expert / your busi­ness online / your idea
  • Using it to: con­nect with cus­tomers / investors / influences

Every­thing that you do with your social media mar­ket­ing should be built on this foun­da­tion. If you are not clear about this, if you are not mind­ful of this when you make deci­sions about what you are going to post on your Face­book page; tweet to your Twit­ter fol­low­ing. You are going to be like a can­dle in the wind and no one is gong to know what you are about.

 

Your social media mar­ket­ing should be spe­cific and objec­tive orientated.”

26 Mar
2012
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be you

23 Mar
2012
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Inspire Mag­a­zine: April 2012 — What are web stan­dards and why should I care?

by Brian Rinaldi
” The grow­ing ubiq­uity of web-enabled devices has led to a main­stream pro­lif­er­a­tion of ter­mi­nol­ogy that was once lim­ited to the con­fines of tech­ni­cal jour­nals for web devel­op­ers and design­ers. Terms like HTML5, JavaScript, and web stan­dards, for instance, have entered into the aver­age tech­nol­ogy user’s lex­i­con, and many tech­nol­ogy debates pre­vi­ously lim­ited to the geek crowd now reg­u­larly enter the national news media discussion.

Nonethe­less, the mean­ing and impor­tance of these terms is rarely explained, which can often lead to mis­un­der­stand­ings. For exam­ple, often­times the term HTML5 is used to mean the set of tech­nol­ogy and tools beyond the updated HTML5 spec­i­fi­ca­tion, includ­ing JavaScript, CSS3, and related frame­works. Other times, it is sim­ply used to refer to the new — and not yet final­ized — HTML stan­dard. The goal of this arti­cle is to help you make sense of the buzz­words and truly under­stand why web stan­dards are impor­tant and how they are chang­ing the world of web design and devel­op­ment as we know it. Specif­i­cally, I dis­cuss some of the his­tory of these terms as well as the cur­rent state of HTML5 and CSS3, and I explore how Adobe is con­tribut­ing to and cre­at­ing tools for these standards.” …

read more via Inspire Mag­a­zine: April 2012 — What are web stan­dards and why should I care?.

HTML5
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22 Mar
2012
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Blog Guide­book: Its Pin­ter­est, Not Brain Surgery — Part 1

” Its Pin­ter­est, Not Brain Surgery — Part 1
About three years ago I think I invented Pin­ter­est. Of course, that was in my mind…it never actu­ally came out and became any­thing, but I thought of the actual idea that it would be great to save all the pho­tos and links in one place and call it some­thing cute. Pin­ter­est is a great name for this fun, orga­ni­za­tional tool — but I would have called it some­thing else, like: PinIt, Dog­gy­BagIt, iLikeIt, MySaves etc…Pinterest seems to con­fuse some peo­ple, I think its the name of the site and all the pretty col­ors every­where. {smile} Ive had friends and com­ments that say “I just dont get it!” Why do you think that is? Today Ill begin a short series on under­stand­ing and using Pin­ter­est for your blog. ..” read more

source/ via Blog Guide­book: Its Pin­ter­est, Not Brain Surgery — Part 1.

Pinterest!
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: jenny via Comp­fight

21 Mar
2012
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What Small Busi­nesses Can Learn from Goliath | Entrepreneur.com

What Small Busi­nesses Can Learn from Goliath

BY PETER S. COHAN| Yesterday|

It’s com­monly assumed that all small busi­nesses are clever and agile and all big ones are slow, plod­ding and unable to adapt to change. But nei­ther of those com­monly held beliefs are true.

Let’s con­sider the big-business excep­tions. The fol­low­ing dis­cus­sion includes case stud­ies from Proc­ter & Gam­ble, Intuit and Google, as well as lessons for small busi­nesses in need of a jolt of creativity.

P&G launched an employee-driven design con­sult­ing unit in 2004 called Clay Street, which the consumer-products giant used to help turn­around a shrink­ing brand. That year, Clay Street — using a revolv­ing cast of employ­ees from all over the com­pany, includ­ing interns — helped revive a then-tired brand of sham­poo, Herbal Essences. The cross-functional team that spent 10 to 12 weeks at Clay Street came up with ideas that almost dou­bled Herbal Essences’ sales growth rel­a­tive to a year earlier.

The team dis­cov­ered a dif­fer­ent idea of what the word “organic” means for today’s con­sumer, ver­sus the mean­ing it held for older gen­er­a­tions. When asked to shop for items they con­sid­ered organic, the P&G team selected “below the ground” prod­ucts like herbal tea, health food and gra­nola. By con­trast, the Gen Y consumer’s theme was “all pos­si­bil­i­ties” — includ­ing items such as smooth­ies and brightly col­ored blouses. As a result, the com­pany rehabbed the product’s branding.

via What Small Busi­nesses Can Learn from Goliath | Entrepreneur.com.David: Psa 37:4
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Real­is­tic Imag­i­na­tions via Comp­fight

 

Les­son: Take all opin­ions into con­sid­er­a­tion. Ask­ing employ­ees to chip in on projects and lend their ideas can help fuel inno­va­tion.

Mean­while, TurboTax-maker Intuit is cre­at­ing what it calls a cul­ture of “fru­gal exper­i­men­ta­tion,” which among other things spawned the idea for offer­ing debit cards to peo­ple with­out bank accounts. An Intuit finance employee — not a “prod­uct per­son” — noticed that the peo­ple who need tax refund checks the most are often ones who don’t have bank accounts.

Related: Five Tips to Inspire Inno­va­tion at Your Small Business

She sug­gested rout­ing people’s tax refunds to debit cards pro­vided by the com­pany. With just a rudi­men­tary web­site, which Intuit founder Scott Cook wasn’t ini­tially keen on, the employee was able to test her idea. She expected 100 tak­ers but got 1,000. Sur­pris­ingly, half of those beta testers did in fact have bank accounts — mean­ing that the mar­ket need was much greater than Intuit expected.

Les­son: Let go of the reins some­times. Even though Cook had reser­va­tions about the project — he let his employee go for it.

Then, of course, there’s Google. The search giant is well known for let­ting work­ers spend 20 per­cent of their time brain­storm­ing — dream­ing up prod­ucts or ser­vices that inter­est them. This mas­sive decen­tral­iza­tion of inno­va­tion — called Time Off — helps keep Google ahead of com­peti­tors like Yahoo and Microsoft.

Related: Find­ing Suc­cess by Putting Com­pany Cul­ture First

An exam­ple of how this strat­egy has paid off: In 2005, Yahoo started the Panama ini­tia­tive, a project designed to catch up with Google’s adver­tis­ing sys­tem, AdWords. Though the ini­tia­tive involved 300 peo­ple over 20 months, Google has main­tained roughly 60 per­cent lead over Yahoo in the search-engine mar­ket­ing realm thanks in large part to Google employ­ees who’ve used their Time Off to help strengthen the company’s ad prowess.

Les­son: Let your employ­ees dream. In addi­tion to adver­tis­ing model improve­ments, Google’s employ­ees have come up with count­less inno­va­tions from gmail to Orkut, which is a social net­work­ing site that’s really pop­u­lar out­side the U.S.

 

source: http://www.entrepreneur.com/blog/223182


18 Mar
2012
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How to Set Up Your Free­lance Busi­ness for the Long Haul

Pressed
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Dan Ceder­holm via Comp­fight

 

By Steven Snell | Pub­lished May 4th, 2010 in Business/Freelance - source: http://designm.ag/freelance/long-haul/

” When start­ing a free­lance design busi­ness the nat­ural pri­mary con­cern is how to find clients and to start get­ting pay­ing work. While this is nec­es­sary in order to achieve suc­cess as a free­lancer, there are a lot of other details that need to be con­sid­ered as well. How quickly you’re able to get those first pay­ing clients will actu­ally have less impact on your long-term suc­cess than the amount of time and atten­tion you ded­i­cate to set­ting up your busi­ness on a proper foundation.

In this post we’ll look at the early stages of a free­lance design busi­ness and what aspects can have a sig­nif­i­cant long-term impact. Focus­ing on these impor­tant issues from the start will help you to save time and headaches down the road, and your busi­ness will be more solid because of it…”

1. Know Your Goals and Priorities

2. Have Sav­ings Set Aside to Fall Back On

3. Reg­is­ter Your Business

4. Hire an Accountant

5. Open a Busi­ness Bank Account

6. Have Legal Doc­u­ments Prepared

7. Start Work­ing on Items for Your Portfolio

8. Estab­lish Poli­cies and Procedures

9. Take the Time to Design a Qual­ity Port­fo­lio Site

10. Focus on Cre­at­ing Suc­cess for Your Clients

11. Start to Build a Pro­fes­sional Network

12. Set Up Social Net­work­ing Profiles

13. Ask Clients for Feed­back on the Experience

14. Re-Invest in Your Business

15. Set Aside Time for Learn­ing on a Con­tin­ual Basis

Please read the whole arti­cle under: http://designm.ag/freelance/long-haul/ (source)

 

18 Mar
2012
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what to do …

18 Mar
2012
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Get Your Blog’s Social Shar­ing On Track | Who Design Today

” Key­word place­ment, page rank, traf­fic, you’ve ago­nized over all of it. Which is all the more rea­son to make sure peo­ple are read­ing and inter­act­ing with your blog every day. With­out your read­ers, your blog is a blip in the over-populated blo­gos­phere. Once you’ve writ­ten your post, it’s up to you and your read­ers to get it out to the masses. Social shar­ing is your best path to success. …”

read more/ source:

via Get Your Blog’s Social Shar­ing On Track | Who Design Today.

 

I LOVE Airshows
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Amy Lloyd via Comp­fight

18 Mar
2012
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QR Code Design is an other idea to get atten­tion on your “prod­uct packaging”

Composition 5.01
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: bur­ton­wood & holmes via Comp­fight

 

“.….  What can be done?Check out the raw QR. Sim­ple, bor­ing and, as men­tioned pre­vi­ously, it looks like a cross­word puz­zle. You can gen­er­ate one of these via a QR gen­er­a­tor found on many web sites. The next step is up to you. Here are a few exam­ples of QR design. …” read more and source: http://bit.ly/oWuffo

————————————————————————————————————————-

… and please watch this video

 

Link to the web­site: http://goqr.me/

17 Mar
2012
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Pack­ag­ing design

Creative Japanese Barcodes
Photo Credit: Piu­tus via Comp­fight

photo source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/90673887@N00/2530575887/

Pack­age design has the goal to attract cus­tomers atten­tion. For the per­fec­tion you have to find con­stantly new ideas. Here is one, use the bar­code  for improve­ment of  attrac­tive pack­age design.

17 Mar
2012
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the Sat­ur­day quote

17 Mar
2012
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time for new col­ors — spring 2012

16 Mar
2012
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How Great Bosses Moti­vate Employ­ees | Inc.com

Remark­able bosses aren’t great on paper. Great bosses are remark­able based on their actions.

Results are everything—but not the results you might think.

Con­sis­tently do these five things and every­thing else fol­lows. You and your busi­ness ben­e­fit greatly.

More impor­tantly, so do your employees.

1. Develop every employee. Sure, you can put your pri­mary focus on reach­ing tar­gets, achiev­ing results, and accom­plish­ing con­crete goals—but do that and you put your lead­er­ship cart before your achieve­ment horse.

With­out great employ­ees, no amount of focus on goals and tar­gets will ever pay off. Employ­ees can only achieve what they are capa­ble of achiev­ing, so it’s your job to help all your employ­ees be more capa­ble so they—and your business—can achieve more.

It’s your job to pro­vide the train­ing, men­tor­ing, and oppor­tu­ni­ties your employ­ees need and deserve. When you do, you trans­form the rel­a­tively bor­ing process of review­ing results and track­ing per­for­mance into some­thing a lot more mean­ing­ful for your employ­ees: Progress, improve­ment, and per­sonal achievement. …”

read more/ source:

via How Great Bosses Moti­vate Employ­ees | Inc.com.

16 Mar
2012
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8 Steps to Han­dle Cus­tomer Com­plaints | Inc.com

Cus­tomer com­plaints are inevitable.  If you run a busi­ness that sells to the pub­lic no mat­ter how great your goods or ser­vices are the old adage will even­tu­ally be proven true: You can­not please 100% of the peo­ple 100% of the time.

Most cus­tomer con­cerns can be dealt with sim­ply by com­ply­ing with the person’s rea­son­able requests. From time-to-time, how­ever, you will come across those cus­tomers who will demand some­thing that sim­ply is unwar­ranted or impos­si­ble to deliver. No mat­ter the issue at the heart of the com­plaint it is impor­tant to remem­ber these rules when resolv­ing your cus­tomer ser­vice issues:

1.  Lis­ten

When­ever you set out to han­dle a cus­tomer com­plaint the first thing that you must do is lis­ten. Lis­ten to the cus­tomer to fig­ure out why they are upset. Lis­ten to the cus­tomer to deter­mine whether any of your poli­cies were not abided by or if this is some­thing out­side or not con­tem­plated by your sys­tems. Lis­ten to what they want from you to resolve the issue. A refund? A replace­ment? Some­one else to replace their cur­rent ser­vice rep­re­sen­ta­tive at your company? … ”

read more/ source:

via 8 Steps to Han­dle Cus­tomer Com­plaints | Inc.com.

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